Tag: johngreen

Book Review: Paper Towns (John Green).

Paper Towns

-John Green.


I loved reading The Fault in Our Stars and Looking For Alaska. This book has been sitting on my shelf for a couple of years now, and finally, I read it. Paper Towns by John Green is a coming of age story set in the senior year of high school. It follows the story of Quentin, nicknamed Q, as he follows clues to try and find his childhood friend and crush Margo Roth Spiegelman.

The story starts with a bit of flashback in a way. Q and Margo are neighbors. They were close as kids, always off on adventures when one day they come across a dead body while cycling. The story moves to the present day, where Q and Margo are in their senior year of high school. Q is fascinated by Margo, romantically interested in her, but they have drifted apart over the years. One night, Q is awoken by a knock on his window, and it is Margo. The rest of the night is filled with shenanigans and adventures; it’s the most amount of time the two have spent together in years.


The next morning Q wakes up to find Margo gone. She has run away from home. It is not the first time she has done this, and she always leaves behind clues. This time the clues are for Q, and he is determined to find Margo. The rest of the story follows his search for Margo, trying to understand the clues she left for him. The plot then follows Q’s efforts to figure out where Margo went with the help of his friends. Quentin’s two best friends are Ben and Radar. Q tells them about Margo, and they immediately decide to help him. Lacey is Margo’s friend who, Margo thinks betrayed her, but she also joins the guys to find Margo.


Margo is such an enigmatic character. She seems to have everything, be anything she wants to be, but as the story progresses the layers are peeled off. Q realizes that he had an idea in his head about who Margo was, but he didn’t really know her. The friendship between Q, Radar, and Ben is so realistic and funny. Ben and Radar are supportive of Q understanding why the driving forces behind his quest. Ben can be a bit dramatic but it didn’t bother me much. They try to get him to enjoy the present, their last year in high school together instead of always worrying about Margo. This story is Q’s journey. He discovers himself. Like any other John Green works, the metaphors in this book are beautiful.


The story is a combination of comedy, heartfelt moments, and mystery. The way the story is written kept me hooked. I wanted to know the mystery that was Margo. The sense of identity is a constant theme that plays throughout the story. Each character has a different interpretation about who and what Margo is while no one knows her. It feels like Margo is an idea than an actual character. Q is worried about her and at one point is seriously concerned for her well-being. Her clues at times seem vague, and even the gang has trouble figuring them out.

This is a YA novel, but it is cleverly written. Q is such a relatable character. He is a little lost, especially in the beginning and everyone can relate to feeling lost at some point or the other. This story is more about the journey than the destination. We find out what happens to Margo in the end, and I thought it was worth it. Margo and Q have a conversation when he finds her that helps change his perspective; making his journey seem worthwhile. This book is thoughtful, philosophical, emotional, and funny. I loved reading this book.

*Click on the book cover above to get a copy.

Currently Reading (January ’21)

My reading list for this month.

  1. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is a classic novel. This is a passionate love story of Catherine and Heathcliff. I have just started reading this book, and the descriptions are written beautifully. It sets an entirely different landscape and atmosphere from the start adding to its gothic element. The timeline is a little confusing in the beginning, but I hope it’ll get better as the story progresses.

2. Paper Towns by John Green.

I loved reading The Fault in Our Stars and Looking for Alaska. I hope I’ll feel the same about Paper Towns. This coming of age story is about Quentin nicknamed Q, and his neighbor and crush for years, Margo Roth Spiegelman. Margo and Q aren’t close friends anymore as they were when they were kids. One night Margo knocks on Q’s window after years. They spend that night doing all sorts of shenanigans, and the next morning Margo disappears. It is going well so far so, fingers crossed.

3. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut.

I wanted to finish this book in December itself. As you can see, that didn’t happen. Hopefully, I will be able to finish it this month. This story is based on Vonnegut’s experience as a POW during World War II in Dresden is an intriguing story. I am a few chapters in, but it can be too heavy at times. I can’t read this book for hours.

4. A Pair of Silk Stockings by Kate Chopin.

I have this short story in my 50 greatest short stories book. I have been meaning to read something written by Kate Chopin for years, and I thought starting with this short story might be a good idea. The story revolves around Mrs. Sommers, who decides to indulge herself for a day by spending money.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

*Click on the book covers to get a copy.

Top Five Favorite YA Books

I have read a lot of young adult books lately and while some didn’t interest me at all, others were mostly predictable. By the first couple of pages I was bored and finishing them started to feel like a task. Finally I was able to find the kind of books I love reading. I must admit I ended up reading some of these books more than once. This is a list of the books which left a long-lasting impression on me because I found them relatable. I know at the end of the day these books are fiction but still they seem to be grounded; realistic which is why I loved them.

1. Thirteen Reasons Why – Jay Asher.

There are no words to describe the roller coaster ride of emotions this book takes you on. The plot is engaging and fast paced, the characters are so real that nothing feels forced or a plot convenience. The first couple of pages are enough to suck you in. Just a suggestion; keep a box of tissues handy while reading this one.

2. All the Bright Places – Jennifer Niven.

I had a hard time recovering emotionally after reading this one. The story deals with a heavy subject like mental health to an extent also about death but the book can’t be simple classified as sad. Violet and Theodore pull you into their story; make you happy and sad and everything in between. Watch out for the ending.

3. We Were Liars – E. Lockhart.

I started reading this book with one thing in mind but it turned out to be something entirely different. It markets itself as the story of four super privileged kids and the summer of their lives but it is so much more thrilling and heartbreaking than you expect it to be. This book will make you turn right back to the beginning of the story after you have finished reading the end.

4. Looking For Alaska – John Green.

John Green loves to make us sad; this book is another example of it. Reading this book will put you through so many emotions, you will be overwhelmed. The first half is a fun-filled ride but that is just a devious ploy to make us think this book might not be a cry fest like The Fault in Our Stars. It stays in your mind long after you have finished it.

5. Maybe Someday – Colleen Hoover.

I realized that this is the only book on my list which is actually a light read. It is full of emotions and turmoil but at the heart it is a love story. The characters fall in love in such an organic way and you can’t help but feel all giddy inside yourself. I read ninety percent of this book in one sitting till I was too exhausted to keep my eyes open, I had to know what happens next. It is engaging from start to finish.

*Get a copy by clicking on the book covers above.